FAQ for Estate Planning Clients of JUX Law Firm and Molever Law Firm

The following is a list of frequently asked questions from people whose estate planning needs were served by JUX Law Firm and/or The Molever Law Firm.

Where are my estate planning documents now?

You have the original documents. Those are the official versions. Your attorney probably kept copies in paper or electronic form. The attorney who prepared your estate plan is responsible for those copies. If you need copies, you should start by contacting the attorney who drafted your estate plan. If that fails, you can contact me.

Do I need to send updates to your law firm?

No. Some law firms encourage you to “update your file at the firm” in an effort to secure your patronage, but this is not necessary for your estate plan to work effectively. What matters most is that your successor trustee (the person who will manage your trust after you pass) knows where to find your estate planning binder. Keep all your updated information (bank accounts, life insurance policies, etc.) in your estate planning binder. It is not necessary to have copies at a law firm.

Do I need to update my estate plan if someone changes their name or address?

No. As long as your family member was properly identified when your trust or will was created, you do not need to pay for an updated estate plan merely because names or addresses changed.

Do I need to update my estate plan if new grandchildren are born?

No. Estate plans from The Molever Law Firm and JUX Law Firm covered grandchildren (and great-grandchildren) who are living along with those not yet born. Of course, if you want to treat a single grandchild different from your other grandchildren, that would need to be spelled out in your estate plan.

What should I or my family do after a death?

After the passing of you or someone who has a key part in your estate plan, you have a few options: You are welcome to contact me. If you know what to do, you don’t need to contact any attorney. You can contact another estate planning attorney to assist you.

When should I contact an attorney?

In general, your should contact an estate planning attorney when there is a significant change in one of these three areas:

  1. Health: you have a significant change in health that will soon require long term care
  2. Wealth: you receive a large inheritance, you win the lottery, or you have some other major change in the size of your estate
  3. Family Circumstances: you want to change who will manage your assets or receive your assets after you are gone

Who will support me now?

You have many options. You are welcome to contact me. If another attorney drafted your estate plan, you can contact that attorney. Or you can hire an entirely different estate planning attorney.

What if I have questions about my estate plan?

You have many options. You can contact the attorney who drafted your estate plan. You can contact me. Or you can contact an entirely different estate planning attorney in your area.

What if I need changes to my estate plan?

You are welcome to email me a list of the changes you need and I will provide you with a quote. If you prefer someone closer to your home, feel free to email me; I will do my best to provide you with a referral to an experienced estate planning attorney close to you. Of course, you are always welcome to contact any estate planning attorney to help you. You are not stuck with your original estate planning attorney.

Can you help me find an estate planning attorney closer to my home?

Sure. You can contact me, mention that you need a referral to someone closer to your city, and I will help you find a more convenient attorney to assist you.

How much are attorney consultations?

It depends on what you need. Each attorney has their own policy and process for consultations. When you contact the attorney, explain what you need and ask for a quote. The attorney will guide you through the process.

How can I get answers to other questions?

You can contact me.